Entries Tagged as U.S. - Washington

Tots in Tents at Fay Bainbridge Park

The closest bike camping to Seattle! We rode 4.5 miles from Fremont, WA to the Seattle Ferry Terminal, followed by a 35-minute ferry ride to Bainbridge Island, and a seven mile ride to Fay Bainbridge Park.

Oregon's Glorious Columbia Gorge

 

The mighty Columbia River, separating Oregon and Washington in the spectacular Columbia River Gorge, is a path for a great overnight bike trip.

The Rectangle Ride: Bloated Fish & Butt Raisins

"The Rectangle Ride" is a 110-mile route that starts in Arlington, Washington, heads east to Darrington, north to Rockport, west to Sedro-Woolley, and then loops back south to Arlington. It was a perfect, autumnal weekend for a rectangular ride with spectacular company.

First Overnight: “Urban Bikepacking” from Edmonds to Port Townsend

Excited, nervous, and downright giddy, we exchange four wheels for two and load onto the ferry that goes from Edmonds to Kingston, Washington. We may as well have training wheels, uncertain as we are of biker-ferry protocol. Is it safe to just leave them? Bike-thirsty pirates and misguided harbor seals may be lurking. The ferry attendant kindly instructs us that most people hang the handlebar over the side rail and go upstairs. Then relax.

Labor Day Fun on the John Wayne Pioneer Trail, Part 2

Toward the middle of our second day on the John Wayne Pioneer Trail, we arrived at the Thorp Tunnels. Unlike the Hyak and Whittier tunnels of the day before, the state has not dedicated any funds to repairing these tunnels. It shows. The concrete at the entrances is crumbling and sections of wall inside have caved. It’s not exactly dangerous, but I wouldn’t call it safe, either. Don’t put me in one of those during an earthquake! In a surprising act of reasonableness, the state actually allows you to travel through these tunnels. There is an unsettling waiver of liability they ask you to sign before you do so, however.

Labor Day Fun on the John Wayne Pioneer Trail, Part 1

For years, I’ve had the idea in my head that it would be fun to cycle the length of the John Wayne Pioneer Trail, 110 miles from North Bend to the mighty Columbia River. Any plans I might have had got temporarily quashed in 2009 when state parks closed the five tunnels on the trail because of falling debris hazards. Flash forward to July 2013 … and all the tunnels are open again! Some have been repaired. Others are enter at your own risk. 

Seattle to Fort Ebey State Park Loop

As a newbie to Washington state (two years), I am amazed by the variety of cycling terrain available to explore here. Want mountains? You got 'em. Want valleys? You got 'em. Want islands? You got 'em. Want rollers? You got 'em. Want deserts? Well, you have to go over to the east side of the mountains, but you still got 'em. I know there are many other places in the world blessed with grand outdoor scenes, but this is the first place I’ve lived with such natural wonders just outside my door.